Viagra ( Sildenafil )

Cialis vs. Viagra

Are Cialis and Viagra the Same Thing?

Cialis (tadalafil) and Viagra (sildenafil) are phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors used for treating impotence (erectile dysfunction, or ED).

What Are Possible Side Effects of Cialis?

Common side effects of Cialis include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of Viagra?

Common side effects of Viagra include:

  • warmth or redness in the face, neck, or chest,
  • stuffy nose,
  • headaches,
  • stomach pain,
  • upset stomach,
  • nausea,
  • diarrhea,
  • memory problems,
  • back pain,
  • an inability to differentiate between the colors green and blue,
  • loss of hearing,
  • ringing in the ears,
  • and dizziness.

What is Cialis?

Cialis is a prescription medicine taken by mouth for the treatment of:

  • men with erectile dysfunction (ED)
  • men with symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • men with both ED and BPH

What is Viagra?

Viagra is a prescription medicine used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). You will not get an erection just by taking this medicine. Viagra helps a man with erectile dysfunction get and keep an erection only when he is sexually excited (stimulated).

Viagra is not for use in women or children.

It is not known if Viagra is safe and effective in women or children under 18 years of age.

SL >Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Causes and Treatment See Slideshow

What Drugs Interact With Cialis?

Do not take Cialis if you:

  • take any medicines called “nitrates”.
  • use recreational drugs called “poppers” like amyl nitrite and butyl nitrite.
  • take any medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators, such as riociguat.
  • are allergic to Cialis or Adcirca, or any of its ingredients.

Call your healthcare provider or get help right away if you have any of the symptoms of an allergic reaction listed above.

What Drugs Interact With Viagra?

Do not take Viagra if you:

  • take medicines called nitrates (such as nitroglycerin)
  • use street drugs called “poppers” such as amyl nitrate or amyl nitrite, and butyl nitrate
  • take any medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators such as riociguat (Adempas)
  • are allergic to sildenafil, as contained in Viagra and REVATIO, or any of the ingredients in Viagra. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in Viagra.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take1, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Viagra may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Viagra works causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:

  • medicines called nitrates (see “What is the most important information I should know about Viagra?”)
  • medicines called guanylate cyclase stimulators, such as riociguat (Adempas)
  • medicines called alpha blockers such as Hytrin (terazosin HCl), Flomax (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura (doxazosin mesylate), Minipress (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral (alfuzosin HCl), Jalyn (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), or Rapaflo (silodosin). Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure. In some patients, the use of Viagra with alpha-blockers can lead to a drop in blood pressure or to fainting.
  • medicines called HIVprotease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir), indinavir sulfate (Crixivan), saquinavir (Fortovase or Invirase) or atazanavir sulfate (Reyataz)
  • some types of oralantifungal medicines, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral), and itraconazole (Sporanox)
  • some types of antibiotics, such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), telithromycin (Ketek), or erythromycin
  • other medicines that treat high blood pressure
  • other medicines or treatments for ED

Viagra contains sildenafil, which is the same medicine found in another drug called REVATIO. REVATIO is used to treat a rare disease called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Viagra should not be used with REVATIO or with other PAH treatments containing sildenafil or any other PDE5 inhibitors (such as Adcirca [tadalafil]).

Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of these medicines, if you are not sure.

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

How Should Cialis Be Taken?

Take Cialis exactly as your healthcare provider prescribes it. Your healthcare provider will prescribe the dose that is right for you.

Some men can only take a low dose of Cialis or may have to take it less often, because of medical conditions or medicines they take.

Do not change your dose or the way you take Cialis without talking to your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider may lower or raise your dose, depending on how your body reacts to Cialis and your health condition.

Cialis may be taken with or without meals.

If you take too much Cialis, call your healthcare provider or emergency room right away.

How Should Viagra Be Taken?

Take Viagra exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.

Your healthcare provider will tell you how much Viagra to take and when to take it.

Your healthcare provider may change your dose if needed.

Take Viagra about 1 hour before sexual activity. You may take Viagra between 30 minutes to 4 hours before sexual activity if needed.

Viagra can be taken with or without food. If you take Viagra after a high fat meal (such as a cheeseburger and french fries), Viagra may take a little longer to start working

Do not take Viagra more than 1 time a day.

If you accidentally take too much Viagra, call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

QUESTION

Men’s Health Resources
Featured Centers
Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

Pill Identifier Tool Quick, Easy, Pill Identification

Drug Interaction Tool Check Potential Drug Interactions

Pharmacy Locater Tool Including 24 Hour, Pharmacies

Related Drugs

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

Copyright © 2019 by RxList Inc. RxList does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information.